Wednesday, September 15, 2010

CA legislator: Can you hear me now?

One California Air Resources Board critic may have gotten some job protection – albeit temporary – from several state assembly members.

California state Assemblyman Dan Logue, R-Marysville, and 20 other Republican lawmakers signed on to a letter to UCLA’s chancellor, asking Gene Block to “assure proper procedures have been followed by UCLA regarding the dismissal of Dr. Enstrom.”

As Land Line has reported, James Enstrom is battling to keep his job at UCLA, and the professor believes his public questioning of science behind CARB’s most expensive diesel rule has made him an enemy.

Enstrom believes he’s been in the crosshairs of many movers and shakers including Mary Nichols, CARB’s chairman and a veteran air quality regular.

Nichols, who worked in the EPA during the Clinton administration, is a former UCLA faculty member.

The university has allowed Enstrom to remain on the job until March, or until the appeal process runs its course.

“If Dr. Enstrom is dismissed before his appeal has been fully evaluated, we plan to promptly hold a hearing in Sacramento on this matter,” the letter said.

The battle over Enstrom’s job may prove important to truckers and, like Logue, we’ll be watching.

4 comments:

  1. Great article...I would like to add something.Truck drivers are the backbone of the nation. Yet, the entire trucking industry is pummeled every day by special interest groups, government agencies, and more DOT regulations. Does anyone, other than me, feel unwanted? If truckers stood together as they once did, this harassment would come to a screeching halt. The Teamsters Union was once feared and respected. Now, every time drivers turn around there’s some new regulation shoved in their faces.
    Truckers and trucking companies are regulated to death. Regulations sometimes seem questionable, and many truckers feel there’s more involved than concerns for safety. There’s a lot of revenue collected from “Them there tickets.” Drivers and companies face Fines for idling, parking, governing engines, polluting the atmosphere, and making to much noise. When’s it going to end?
    Truckers need to make a bold statement that will change opinions of many special interest groups, who, in my opinion, don’t know what they’re talking about. Concern for drivers health, safety, and welfare is appreciated, however if you’ve never been a truck driver, keep your opinions to yourself (no offence intended). Truckers are tough people who accept long hours and hard work as a way of life, while always keeping safety their number one concern. Truckers need to unite and “fight the good fight.”
    Truckers gained a tremendous amount of power when the Nation Brotherhood of Teamsters was formed. Unfortunately, along with power came violence. In Chicago, 1905, Teamsters took on a sympathy strike and lockout by the United Brotherhood of Teamsters. The strike was initiated by a small clothing workers union. The strike was basically aimed at Montgomery Ward, but it affected many others. The strike was violent and deadly. Riots erupted daily. Hundreds of striking workers would clash with strike-breakers (SCABS) and police. By late July, 103 days after the strike began, 21 people were dead and 416 injured. It was the second most deadly dispute in the 20th century.
    I’m not advocating violence, but truckers need to remember what their brothers of the past did to unite truckers and give them strength to stand up against unfair business practices. In 1998, James P. Hoffa, after claiming victory over Ron Carey, was elected as President of the Teamsters on March 19, 1999. The union is now headed in a more moderate direction. On July 25, 2005 the Teamsters disassociated from the AFL-CIO and became a founding member of the new National Trade Union Center / The Change to win federation.
    Today, we live in a different world, intolerant of violence, and facing complex issues in need of serious consideration. Change will only happen if truckers unite and fight unfair laws and labor practices. These battles have moved from the streets and into courtrooms. It’s said that the squeaky wheel gets oiled. Lets start squeaking and get a well deserved oil job that’s fair not only to companies, but to drivers too. Drivers, lets stand up and make our voices heard from a new, reunited trucking community!

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  2. This is the type of politics that have become most distasteful to the voting populace.

    Because of social networking, blogs, and the media, nasty politics and manipulation by people in public office comes to the attention of the voting public quickly.

    Thank you Charlie and Land Line!

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  3. Why is this important? duh ... Every interstate trucker complains about California and CARB stupidity. This tenured Professor dared to reveal the truth / the facts. His reward economic homicide ... kicked out of his job.
    Want to see more true fact? OOIDA and all member truckers need make a major racket insuring that College treats him as if he was spouting the 'earth is going to heck' chant they want.

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  4. Here's more on CARB and the mess they have created for the American Trucking Industry.

    http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2010/10/07/BAOF1FDMRV.DTL#ixzz11iqEfuN9

    I would hope the entire industry gets together on this one and nails the bozos!

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